Creamy Deremen: the heavenly snack from Pangasinan

Pangasinan’s Deremen [Duhruhmon] are young, usually still green, glutinous rice. The English name of this is rice puff.

My mother and father, who are both raised in Pangasinan, claimed deremen from their province is different from others. They said they never had a more tasting deremen treats aside from those made in their native land.

My mother said she grew up enjoying different dessert featuring deremen. She said that the grains processed using the traditional pounding method are tastier than those processed using modern technology. She said the faster way of the rice mills deteriorated the flavor. She even expressed sadness that we, the younger generations, are not able to experience the flavorful treats.

Even before I started schooling, my mother used to make us the “no-cooked inlubi,” a creamy deremen dessert with a twist of coconut flesh. However, since we are residing in Quezon City, we can only taste it once or twice a year when my mom goes home to visit the tomb of my grandfather and grandmother. So, just imagine how much we crave for it.

Creamy Deremen

To make this dessert, the deremen are first washed and then soaked into the water until they are soft. Then, add the coconut milk, coconut juice, coconut flesh and then sugar.

The taste? Well, it’s creamy, fruity, with right enough sweetness The coconut juice and flesh complemented the juvenile rice. The texture is unexplainable — you can’t compare to cereal or rice puff soaked in milk. That’s way better than that.

Me, I want it cold and oozing with sauce. I also love it with evaporated milk.

My mother used to recommend to immediately eat her specialty because the rice is quick in absorbing the coconut milk and juice, which will result in the consistency of a biko.

Written by Ringo

I am a home base guy who loves food, writing, books, and dogs...

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